University of Hawaiʻi System News /news News from the University of Hawaii Thu, 22 Feb 2024 22:21:21 +0000 en-US hourly 1 /news/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/cropped-91News512-1-32x32.jpg University of Hawaiʻi System News /news 32 32 Health programs collaborate for better patient care /news/2024/02/22/health-programs-collaborate-better-patient-care/ Thu, 22 Feb 2024 22:21:21 +0000 /news/?p=192374 Reading time: 2 minutes Students learned to reach across healthcare specialties to support patients’ wishes.

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Students working at the table
Working on patient discharge plan

More than 70 students across various health programs at gained valuable insights into the multifaceted nature of providing patient-centered age-appropriate care through a symposium in January.

Students working at a table
Health program students developing patient management plans

Community Health Education Program Director Hilary Hacker said, “This symposium, created from a shared commitment to excellence in healthcare training, aims to transcend traditional silos.”

The collaboration with the University of Hawaiʻi’s Geriatrics Workforce Enhancement Program drew students from practical nursing, community health worker, physical therapy assistant, occupational therapy assistant, respiratory care practitioner and medical assisting.

It is helpful to see the aspects of patient care through the lens of other health professionals
—Elizabeth Kalahiki, respiratory care student

“I genuinely enjoyed interacting with all the health science students,” said Jesse Temple, a student in the physical therapist assistant program. “Not only was I able to understand how to establish a better patient plan of care, but my knowledge was enhanced on each representative’s role within the health care team. I can’t wait to work alongside each and every one of them!”

91 ԴDz Professor and Geriatric Medicine Chair Kamal Masaki prefaced the symposium with insights on “Developing an Age-Friendly Health System,” after which student groups were introduced to a geriatrics case to identify issues and develop preliminary management plans. Actors representing a patient and his daughter shared what mattered most to them, and the teams reconvened to adjust their plans with those considerations.

“It was beneficial to witness and understand how important every field is when working together for the ultimate care and needs of the patient,” said practical nursing student Skye Kalehuawehe. “I know that this experience will help me advance as a future nurse and that I can use these skills learned today to my advantage to give the best possible care to those in need.”

Student teams presented their care plans, followed by a panel discussion where faculty and professionals from diverse healthcare fields shared their clinical experiences and discussed lessons learned.
“This was a great opportunity to collaborate with other health fields to formulate a plan from varying perspectives with the patient’s wishes in mind,” said Elizabeth Kalahiki, a respiratory care student. “It is helpful to see the aspects of patient care through the lens of other health professionals. As a future respiratory care practitioner, I had a chance to see how patient care continues after discharge, as most of our involvement has been in an acute setting.”

Students smiling
Kapiʻolani CC health program students
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91 ԴDz initiatives aim to promote alcohol education /news/2024/02/22/uh-manoa-initiatives-alcoholedu/ Thu, 22 Feb 2024 21:58:46 +0000 /news/?p=192371 Reading time: 3 minutes 91 Mānoa’s comprehensive alcohol education programs equip students with knowledge, resources and support for responsible alcohol use.

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Students walking on U H Manoa campus

In an effort to better prepare University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa students to make responsible alcohol usage choices, the has introduced the campus to , a national online program designed to educate college students about alcohol use, misuse and potential consequences.

AlcoholEdu features interactive modules featuring videos, quizzes and scenarios that cover topics related to alcohol and other drug consumption. The content is personalized for students at 91 Mānoa.

hand waving away wine bottle

“These initiatives promote the health and safety of students by equipping them with knowledge about the potential physical and mental health consequences of substance misuse, as well as strategies for responsible decision-making,” said Alcohol and Other Drug Counselor Kuʻulei Salzer, from the University Health Services Mānoa, Health Promotion. “Moreover, education and ongoing support programs help students maintain their academic performance by mitigating the negative impact of substance misuse on concentration, memory and overall well-being.”

91 Mānoa students are strongly encouraged .

Fostering alcohol-healthy student relationships

In addition to AlcoholEdu, students are also encouraged to attend BASICS (Brief Alcohol Screening and Intervention for College Students), a program that provides them with personalized feedback on their alcohol use patterns and associated risks.

Through BASICS, students are educated on responsible drinking practices, coping mechanisms for managing stress and peer pressure, and goal-setting techniques, empowering students to develop healthier relationships with alcohol and navigate social situations more safely.

Students who feel they need additional support for their alcohol or other drug use can complete the to schedule a session with Salzer. More information can be found at the University Health Services website.

Perceptions of alcohol consumption

To determine student perceptions of alcohol usage, Health Promotion conducted a Mānoa Alcohol Project Survey, finding that 15% of students believe that their peers drink every day—in reality, the amount total is less than 1% of students drinking daily.

“This misperception could lead other students to believe that heavy drinking is a normal part of the college experience, when in reality, the majority of students are making low-risk choices when it comes to alcohol,” said Salzer. “By educating young adults about alcohol and drug use, we can bring more clarity and reinforce the actual substance use norms at 91 Mānoa.”

Safe space to seek help

At 91 Mānoa, a is implemented with the primary goal of encouraging students to seek help in alcohol-related emergencies.

“We aim to create a safe space for students to ask for help, and under this policy, if they seek medical assistance for themselves or others, they are granted certain protections from disciplinary action related to underage drinking,” explained Theresa Crichfield, associate vice provost for student success and 91 Mānoa dean of students. “This is something we applied informally in the past, and when the Good Samaritan Policy was passed in 2015, we officially formalized this practice at 91 Mānoa.”

By addressing substance abuse proactively, students are supported in their personal development, and empowered to navigate social pressures effectively, boosting their overall success and well-being.

For any questions or concerns, students can email alcohol@hawaii.edu, or visit the University Health Services website for more information.

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Native Hawaiian Organizations invest in 91 students, communities /news/2024/02/22/native-hawaiian-organizations-invest-in-uh-students/ Thu, 22 Feb 2024 20:50:12 +0000 /news/?p=192359 Reading time: 3 minutes Alakaʻina Foundation and The Hawaiʻi Pacific Foundation lead Native Hawaiian Organizations investing in 91.

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More than two dozen Native Hawaiian Organizations have given to 91 campuses and programs.

Hundreds of Native Hawaiian students have been able to attend a University of Hawaiʻi campus thanks to the financial investments of Native Hawaiian Organizations (NHOs). NHOs are nonprofits that also have majority ownership in one or more for-profit small businesses that compete for federal contracts, and whose profits are returned to Native Hawaiian communities.

More than two dozen NHOs have given to 91, with and taking the lead, investing a combined $5 million over the past five years. These gifts are helping to grow a pipeline of Native Hawaiian leaders to address social, economic and cultural issues.

Alakaʻina Foundation

headshot
Tevita Hala Latu

Tevita Hala Latu of Hilo is in his second year of studying for a fire science degree at Hawaiʻi Community College with the aid of an Alakaʻina Foundation 91 Community College Scholarship. Hala Latu plans to become a firefighter after he graduates and said the scholarship has allowed him to focus on being a full-time student and to pay for books, supplies and materials.

“I couldn’t do it without you,” Hala Latu wrote in a letter of appreciation to Alakaʻina Foundation. “I will prove to you that your investment was well spent. I am currently a 3.8 GPA student and I am motivated to do better. Mahalo, Mahalo, Mahalo for your support!”

large group of people holding a check
Alakaʻina Foundation presented gifts to 91 at an event at Windward Community College in August 2023.

Alakaʻina dzܲԻ岹پDz’s 91 Community College Scholarship supports students pursuing degrees or certificates in vocational and technical fields. The foundation also supports, the Digital Bus Program and scholarships at Kauaʻi Community College; 91 Hilo’s Ka Haka ʻUla O Keʻelikōlani College of Hawaiian Language; the 91 Mānoa Hawaiʻinuiākea School of Hawaiian Knowledge; 91 West Oʻahu; Leeward Community College; and Windward Community College.

The Hawaiʻi Pacific Foundation

9 people
Angilynne Pekelo-Cedillo

Angilynne Pekelo-Cedillo of Waiʻanae was able to complete her master’s degree in social work at the 91 Mānoa Thompson School of Social Work & Public Health last year with support from The Hawaiʻi Pacific dzܲԻ岹پDz’s Haumana Scholarship.

“As a non-traditional [student and] Native Hawaiian mother of seven children, returning to school was difficult financially,” she said. “I owe part of my success to people that make up organizations and foundations that invest in people like me.”

six people holding a check
The Hawaiʻi Pacific Foundation presented gifts to several 91 colleges in January 2024.

The Hawaiʻi Pacific Foundation has given multiple gifts to support 91 Mānoa’s Thompson School of Social Work & Public Health, School of Ocean & Earth Science and Technology, Linguistics Department, Native Hawaiian Center of Excellence at the John A. Burns School of Medicine and Hawaiʻinuiākea School of Hawaiian Knowledge, and 91 West Oʻahu.

For more, go to the .

Related 91 News stories:

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91 tennis player earns first Big West Player of the Week honor /news/2024/02/21/snyder-big-west-player-of-the-week/ Thu, 22 Feb 2024 02:32:00 +0000 /news/?p=192351 Reading time: < 1 minute 91 Mānoa men’s tennis player Quinn Snyder helped the Rainbow Warriors edge out Concordia University Irvine.

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Quinn Snyder

University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa player Quinn Snyder earned his first Big West Player of the Week award. Snyder helped the Rainbow Warriors edge out Concordia University Irvine (CUI), 4-3 by winning both No. 1 singles and No. 1 doubles on the road on February 18.

Snyder opened 91’s second roadtrip of the year with a doubles victory with partner Andy Hernandez over CUI’s Mario Aleksic and Spencer Cinco, 6-3. Snyder then swept his singles match over Max Renz, 6-2, 6-3 to give 91 a 2-0 lead against the Golden Eagles.

Snyder is now 3-2 in singles all at No. 1 and 3-1 in doubles with Hernandez on the No. 1 court.

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91 News Image of the Week: Valentine’s Day /news/2024/02/21/uh-news-image-of-the-week-valentines-day/ Wed, 21 Feb 2024 18:00:45 +0000 /news/?p=192263 Reading time: < 1 minute This week’s image is from Leeward Community College.

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Students smiling in front of a valentine's day wall

This week’s 91 News Image of the Week is from the Leeward Community College .

Students enjoyed the Valentine’s Day event at and .

Previous Images
Jersey day
Nice morning
Garden flowers
Colville’s Glory
Mala at Wailupe beach
All Images of the Week

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Want to get in on the action? The next 91 News Image of the Week could be yours! Submit a photo, drawing, painting, digital illustration of a project you are working on, a moment from a field research outing or a beautiful and/or interesting shot of a scene on your campus. It could be a class visit during which you see an eye-catching object or scene.

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Please include a brief description of the image and its connection to your campus, class assignment or other 91 connection. By submitting your image, you are giving 91 News permission to publish your photo on the 91 News website and 91 social media accounts. The image must be your original work, and anyone featured in your image needs to give consent to its publication.

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Hawaiian Word of the Week: ʻIke /news/2024/02/20/hawaiian-word-of-the-week-ike/ Wed, 21 Feb 2024 08:52:41 +0000 /news/?p=192256 Reading time: < 1 minute ʻIke—To see, know, feel, recognize, perceive, experience.

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—To see, know, feel, recognize, perceive, experience.

Previous ʻōlelo
Paʻahana
Mohala
Ulu
Ui
ō첹
All ʻŌlelo of the Week

“Knowledge isn’t just a destination; it’s the compass guiding my college journey. Each lecture, every book, and every conversation fuels not only my education but also the evolution of my perspective.”

—Quentin Shores, marine biology undergraduate, University of Hawaiʻi at ԴDz.

For more information on other elements of the definition and usage, go to the 91 Hilo .

Olelo of the week

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Peace through tea: 91 ԴDz students learn from 15th gen. tea master /news/2024/02/20/uh-students-learn-from-tea-master/ Wed, 21 Feb 2024 02:46:38 +0000 /news/?p=192306 Reading time: 4 minutes Grandmaster Genshitsu Sen hosted a lecture with the 91 ԴDz Center for Japanese Studies to share knowledge on fostering peace through tea.

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man doing tea ceremony
Genshitsu Sen, 15th generation grand master

Japanese tea ceremony (chadō) courses have been offered on campus by the University of Hawaiʻi at ԴDz since the 1970s. 15th generation Urasenke Grand Master Genshitsu Sen recognized around the world and nearing his 101st birthday in April, introduced this practice, also known as the “Way of Tea” to 91 ԴDz in the early 1950s. At that time, Sen was studying at the university and shared his chadō expertise during evening classes for adult education. Although the initial number of students was small, more enrolled over time as Sen returned through the decades to teach and share his insights.

“While there are many Japanese-Americans in Hawaiʻi, what’s most important for me is that by teaching Japanese traditions, I hope to convey shared human values regardless of nationality or ethnicity,” Sen said.

Celebrating peace

man wearing lei and another man at a microphone
Genshitsu Sen will turn 101-years-old this April.

On February 14, Sen returned for a public lecture to share his knowledge and commitment to fostering peace through tea. Sen, recognized by UNESCO as an Ambassador of Goodwill, spoke at the free event hosted by the 91 ԴDz (CJS) at the Campus Center Ballroom, which was attended by hundreds. He emphasized the principles of the “Way of Tea”: wa, kei, sei and jaku (harmony, respect, purity and tranquility).

Steeped in wisdom

3 people in crowd drinking tea
Hundreds attended the public lecture and tea demonstration.
person holding tea cups on a tray
Tea is served to members of the community after the public lecture.

Madeline Gilbert, a junior majoring in and at 91 ԴDz, took the Way of Tea course currently taught by Akiko Ono Riley, a lecturer and chadō instructor at 91 ԴDz.

“We’re just so lucky to be able to listen to him speak or hear someone of his age and intellect, and he has so many kind and interesting thoughts to give that it’s just an awesome experience,” Gilbert said.

Gilbert attended the lecture with fellow members of the 91 ԴDz Way of Tea club, a student-run organization that has practiced Urasenke-style tea ceremony since 1967. Both the club and Way of Tea courses at 91 ԴDz are held inside Jakuʻan, a traditional tea house at East-West Center donated by Sen in 1972. The chashitsu (authentic tea ceremony house), first constructed in Japan, was reassembled in Hawaiʻi by Japanese artisans who traveled here for the task. The tea house celebrated its 50th anniversary in 2022.

Leading the Way of Tea

person doing tea ceremony
91 ԴDz student Yuma Tochika demonstrates chadō (Japanese tea ceremony).

Yuma Tochika, a 91 ԴDz senior and the current president of the Way of Tea club followed in the footsteps of his parents who were both members during their university days, Tochika, a biology major, sees engaging in this ancient practice as a meaningful connection to his heritage.

“I think it’s sort of like meditation in some aspect. It’s really all about concentration, and even though you have to repeat these almost like choreography in some sense hundreds and hundreds of times, you still have room for improvement,” Tochika said. The Nuʻuanu native is preparing for a special year-long intensive program in Kyoto this April.

Legislative honor

On February 15, the Hawaiʻi House of Representatives held a special ceremony at the State Capitol to commemorate CJS’ Way of Tea Center, 91 ԴDz Way of Tea Club members, Jakuʻan’s 50th anniversary, and Tea Master Sen’s 100th birthday. After House Resolution 11 passed unanimously, Sen and CJS Director Mark Levin were presented with a recognition certificate signed by all of the House members.

large group of people
Genshitsu Sen and members of the 91 Mānoa Way of Tea Center and club are honored at the Hawaiʻi State Capitol.
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Researcher points to holistic climate solutions at global conference /news/2024/02/20/holistic-climate-solutions/ Wed, 21 Feb 2024 02:43:50 +0000 /news/?p=192261 Reading time: 2 minutes Susan Crow, a professor in the College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources, was an invited speaker at the event in December.

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University of Hawaiʻi ԴDz professor Susan Crow, who is leading a $40-million U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) grant to assist Hawaiʻi farmers, ranchers and foresters in implementing sustainable and climate-smart practices was an invited speaker at the annual American Geophysical Union (AGU) in December 2023, which hosts more than 25,000 attendees.

Crow presented “Overcoming barriers to implementation through a holistic framework for characterizing place-based suites of practices that achieve meaningful climate benefits,” and AGU produced a video of her research that was shown at the conference.

Person watering crops

“The climate-smart agriculture session highlighted research around the world tracking holistic impacts of innovative practices on climate and communities and really showcased the intersection of basic research and solutions-oriented approaches,” said Crow, a professor with the 91 ԴDz . “I was honored to be an invited speaker and open the session.”

The conference connected researchers, students and community members from Hawaiʻi with the greater scientific community to network and share our views with others.

Crow and her team created the to develop equitable practices, data systems and decision support tools to promote and actuate meaningful climate benefits in agroecosystems guided by Hawaiʻi-based producers and ancestral practitioners. The project will identify, implement and incentivize the continuation of innovative and Indigenous practices that improve or maintain soil health and generate climate benefits.

“Our current work through the Hawaiʻi Partnership for Climate-Smart commodities is focused on grounding in equity and addressing the many, complex barriers experienced by those in Hawaiʻi to better care for their productive lands,” said Crow. “We aim to support future markets for locally produced, climate-smart (think: ‘in Hawaiʻi, for Hawaiʻi’) food and forest products, and in doing so propel necessary change in local food systems and resiliency of landscapes and communities.”

The AGU attendees come from around the globe to share and learn about the planet and environment, and ask questions surrounding climate change and increasing equity and justice in a changing world.

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ʻŌlelo instructor survives leukemia, empowers Hawaiian homesteaders /news/2024/02/20/olelo-instructor-hawaiian-homesteaders/ Wed, 21 Feb 2024 02:16:25 +0000 /news/?p=192215 Reading time: 4 minutes Windward CC instructor Kapela Wong provides free Hawaiian language classes for Hawaiian homestead residents in Kapolei.

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Kapela Wong teaching
Kapela Wong

Pepeluali (February) marks Mahina ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi or Hawaiian Language Month

Worksheet with vowel clusters
The introduction to Hawaiian language class is a 6-week course

A kumu ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi (Hawaiian language instructor) at is dedicated to empowering more Native Hawaiians residing on Hawaiian 91lands to embrace their native language. Last September, Kapela Wong, a homesteader in East Kapolei, initiated complimentary ka papa ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi (Hawaiian language classes) for residents within Hawaiian homestead communities in Kapolei.

“I really want to enrich our pulapula (homesteaders) because now that we have a growing population of kanaka in Hawaiian 91stead lands in Kapolei, there is still a lot of work to be done, and that includes language,” said Wong.

Wong, a 91 Mānoa alumna who majored in and within the , is hosting the second installment of papa ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi through the end of February in partnership with the Kapolei Community Development Corporation.

‘It’s never too late to learn’

Kapela Wong teaching
Classes are held at Kapolei Heritage Center

The majority of her haumāna (students) are kūpuna (elders) who are enthusiastic about immersing themselves in ʻōlelo, though some begin their Hawaiian language journey with a sense of guilt.

“We’re healing a lot of kūpuna who come and say, ‘ʻMy parents they couldn’t ʻōlelo (speak) to me and I just feel so bad and so shame that I canʻt speak it.’ And I tell them, there’s no reason to feel shame, you did the best you could, and it’s never too late to learn,” Wong explained.

Mokihana Aea is one of the many kūpuna in Wong’s papa (class) on Monday nights. The Hawaiian homesteader has lived in the Maluʻōhai Hawaiian 91s subdivision for the past 24 years and is grateful for the opportunity to finally learn to speak.

“I enjoy the class and wish I did it earlier. I want to pass it down so our kids know their language,” Aea said.

Tomorrow is never promised

Kapela Wong and family
Wong with son Kawelonaakala, daughter Kahiliokalani and husband Kaihilani

Motivated by two life-altering experiences, Wong’s dedication to teaching ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi to fellow kānaka ʻōiwi (Native Hawaiians) found its roots in resiliency. In 2016, the mother of two toddlers faced the daunting diagnosis of aggressive leukemia at the age of 25. Despite the challenges, Wong’s resilient spirit, positive mindset, and unwavering support from her family and friends propelled her to overcome the cancer and enter remission. However, in 2019, doctors discovered leukemia cells in her spinal fluid which left her unable to walk and severely immunocompromised.

Prior to the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, Wong and her caregiver support team including her husband, Kaihilani and parents Steven Kahili and Carolyn Lopes-Shane, sought treatment in Seattle where she recovered from the disease once again. She expresses particular gratitude for the care provided to her keiki (children) by her in-laws, Annette Kuuipolani Kanahele Wong, an associate professor at the at 91 Mānoa who also oversees the Mānaleo (native speaker) Office on campus and Keola Wong, a kumu ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi at Kamehameha Schools Kapālama.

“Cancer can really change a lot of families for the better or for worse. We now make the best of each moment. Be in the present moment, tell each other how much we care and really love one another. I’m grateful that it turned out to be in our favor. We learned to graciously accept that Ke Akua (God) has a plan and to hoʻomanawanui (be patiently steadfast),” Wong expressed.

Hoʻōla hou (renewed life)

Her renewed zest for life shaped her path to teach. In 2021, she began teaching Hawaiian language at Windward CC and later in 2022 she began teaching neighbors on her street in the Kaʻuluokahaʻi Hawaiian 91s subdivision. The idea sprang from a deeply spiritual conservation.

“Ok, Ke Akua, it seems like you want me to do more with my life. I don’t have a whole lot of skills but at the very least, I can put the knowledge that was shared with me by all of my kumu (teachers) from Pūnana Leo o Waiʻanae, Ke Kula Kaiapuni o Ānuenue, 91 Mānoa, and my ʻohana in action and be a bridge and help other kanaka reconnect with our Hawaiian culture through ka ʻŌlelo Makuahine (Mother Language),” Wong said.

Aside from teaching ʻōlelo through Windward CC’s Hawaiʻiloa program, a fully online Hawaiian studies pathway, Wong is also a counselor at a substance abuse treatment center that weaves Western best practices with Hawaiian spiritual values.

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Webinar series to examine barriers, successes in advancing equity /news/2024/02/20/equity-explored-webinars/ Wed, 21 Feb 2024 02:02:33 +0000 /news/?p=192259 Reading time: 2 minutes “Equity Explored” will examine barriers to and successes in advancing equity with multiple events.

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Equity explored banner

A webinar series titled will examine barriers to and successes in advancing equity with multiple events is set to begin on February 27 and run through May 1. Open to all 91 students, faculty and staff, the webinar topics include:

  • Know More, Do More: Recognizing and Responding to Stalking—February 27, 2 p.m
  • Māhū and Decolonizing the Idea of Gender—March 6, 10 a.m
  • Managing Microaggressions—March 27, 10 a.m
  • Who Run the World? Beyoncé, Taylor Swift, and Female Economic Power—May 1, 3 p.m.

In addition, the 91 Commission on the Status of Women will host a week-long series of webinars starting on April 4, Wāhine Mana: Empowering the Women of 91. The topics of female empowerment include: obstacles faced, lessons learned and successes won.

“We each come to 91 with our own experiences, perspectives and identities, and we are committed to fostering a community where those differences are respected and celebrated as we learn and grow together,” said 91 President David Lassner in a February 20 email to the 10-campus system on the webinar series. “Consistent with this commitment, the spring webinar series will share critical skills to help attendees identify inequity and create inclusive spaces.”

To learn more about the series, register for webinars and for information on in-person events on 91 campuses, visit the . The webinar series explores difficult subjects. If you or someone you know needs support, help is available, including confidential help.

The series is offered in collaboration with the Office of the Vice President for Community Colleges System Office of Compliance, 91 EEO/AA and Title IX Offices, PAU Violence, Queerify, the Office of Equity Assurance, and the 91 Commission on the Status of Women.

91 is committed to maintaining and promoting safe and respectful campus environments free from discrimination, harassment, and violence and offers a wide array of resources, including confidential advocates and mental health counselors, for those impacted by intimate partner violence, stalking, or sexual violence. 91 EEO/AA Offices address issues relating to discrimination or harassment based on race, religion, disability, and other protected characteristics.

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